Breaking Down the Cruise Industry

The cruising industry has become a 37 billion dollar business in the past decade. Employing around 178 thousand jobs in the year 2019. This is industry is very large and effects many people not just working on the ship but also the people who live where the ships dock along their trips. Cruising runs and is kept afloat by the constant flow of money coming in to stay ahead of the money going out. The biggest money makers are the cabins where the guest stay but once you get the guests on the boat they bombarded by millions of options to spend their money on. Including restaurants, casinos, spas, theatre, art, entertainment, and tour excursions. With one of the top contenders for bringing in the most money is the bars not just for the alcohol but all drinks.

The cruise industry can make or break the local communities that they dock at. As they said in the video “Cruise Inc Big Money on the High Seas” when the boats comes in everyone makes money with the destination spot making money as soon as the ship hit the dock. If the ships ever stopped coming in it would be detrimental to the local communities.

I have considered my safety if I was ever to board a cruise ship but learning how many cameras they have and about their train security I feel safer. Along with how many drills they do every week to prepare for possible emergencies gives me a little more peace of mind if I was ever to join a cruise. Their are also the possible health emergencies that can arise when joining a cruise. The video talk about how many people have correlated the NORO Virus with cruising but that is just not the case it effects so many American each year on and off the ships. The similarities between the NORO Virus and Covid-19 is rate at which they spread because they are both very contagious. The difference is in the United States only 1 in 110,000 will die from the NORO Virus but Covid-19 is around 1 in 17,905 (numbers are changing every day as the pandemic continues).

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